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The following CDs on climate change are available for reference only in the library.

Climate change - an untold story
Forests for climate: sustainable forest management and climate change
World Wetlands Day 2010: caring for wetlands an answer to climate change | Ramsar
   Convention
Ozone protection and national security- a military perspective: toolkit for defence forces |
   UNEP
2050: The future begins today - recommendations for the EU's future integrated policy on
   climate change | European Parliament
The little climate finance CD: a guide to financing options for forests and climate change |
   Global Canopy Programme
Climate change the solution: be veg go green save the planet | Supreme Masters TV
ISPRS Ahmedabad 2009 workshop: impacts of climate change on agriculture | International
   Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing
Climate change China's actions: changement climatique
Responding to Climate Change | IEA GHG R&D Programme
Let's make climate for change: selection of side events of the United Nations Climate Change
   Conference COP14 | UNFCCC 
CDM projects | NATSOURCE
Prototype Carbon Fund: a public private partnership: Annual Report 2002
Documenting Climate Change: the complete collection of UNFCCC documentation 2006, 8
   United Nations Climate Change Convention (set of 4 CDs)
Brazil's initial national communication to the United Nations Framework Convention on
   Climate Change
Action makes a difference: climate strategy and action in Sweden
Climate plan 2004 | France
Save our planet | Yudhoyono, Susilo Bambang
In good company: corporate India and the climate challenge
Building a low carbon economy
Inventory of glaciers, glacial lakes and identification of potential Glacial Lake Outburst
   affected by global warming in the mountains of Himalayan region
India's ecological footprint: a business perspective
Climate Change 2007: Fourth Assessment Report. IPCC
Beyond Kyoto: Energy dynamics and climate stabilization
Climate policy project activities
Climate Policy Information Package 2003: Comprehensive guide covering research and
   information outreach activities
Climate Policy Information Package 2005
Climate change resource kit: Regional Biodiversity Programme, Asia | IUCN
Global change and ecosystems: EU research for the environment
IPCC: good practice guidance for land use, land-use change and forestry
2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories
Protecting health from climate change: contents of docket | WHO
US action to address energy security, clean development and climate change

Climate change- an untold story | UK : Environment Film Fellowship
The CD presents four key issues related to climate change by four different authors. “Climate's First Orphans” by Nila Madhab Panda highlights- as the global debate on climate change heats up, this film tells the story of 20,000 homeless villagers in the coastal districts of Orissa, whose existence has been wiped out by the rising sea level. The second part of the film titled “The Weeping Apple Tree” by Vijay S Jodha illustrates the complex issue of climate change by focusing on the shifting apple-growing belt in Himachal Pradesh. The third part of the film “A Degree of concern” by Syed Fayaz looks at the implications of climate change on glaciers, and how artificial Glaciers are improving the water supply of Ladakh for now. Lastly, “A Green Agony” by Geeta Singh explores the unique ecosystem of the Sundarbans and analyses the impact of global climate change on this Indian coastal zone.

Forests for climate: sustainable forest management and climate change
The CD contains the details of the Forest Day 2 event held during the COP 14 in Poznan 2008 that brought together nearly 900 participants from a diverse range of forest stakeholders, academics and decision makers from around the world, to discuss key issues that link forests with climate change. Cross-cutting themes that were considered included: adaptation of forests to climate change; addressing forest degradation through sustainable forest management; capacity building for REDD (reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation); and options for integrating REDD into the global climate regime.

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World Wetlands Day 2010: caring for wetlands an answer to climate change | Ramsar Convention.
Climate change is one of the most discussed issues in the world, its effect includes global warming, glacial retreat, water level rise, uneven precipitation rates, etc. Facing this challenge, wetlands have helped a lot in alleviating the problem, even though wetlands only occupy 6 to 8% of the Earth's total surface area. It has been supported by a number of studies that wetlands can attenuate the impact of climate change through the following ways:

•  Marshes, floodplains and lakes can temporary store water and reduce peak flood flows in periods of extreme rainfall or glacier melt. Mangrove forest, delta ecosystems or coral reefs form natural buffers against storms or salt water intrusion.

•  Wetlands store and release water slowly, it is particularly important during drought or insufficient rainfall.

•  Wetlands provide nurseries for coastal fisheries. For humans, wetlands provide sources of fish, food and building materials, as well as keep floodplain farmlands fertile. Wetlands store carbon within plant communities and soil. They slow down carbon dioxide from being released into the atmosphere, this help to moderate climate conditions.

In the other words, the lost of wetlands can increase the impact of climate change. It is time for us to take action together against climate change.

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Ozone protection and national security- a military perspective: toolkit for defence forces | UNEP
The CD provides information to defense establishments across the globe on the design and implementation of ozone-friendly approaches in military equipment, operations and maintenance activities. The author has brought the issue of ozone layer protection to the highest political and armed forces personnel in India and elsewhere in Asia and Pacific region.

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2050: The future begins today - recommendations for the EU's future integrated policy on climate change | European Parliament
The European Parliament passed a resolution setting out clear objectives for EU climate-change policy. The report underlines the importance of cutting greenhouse gas emissions in developed countries from 1990 levels: by 25% to 40% for 2020, and by 80% for 2050. The resolution was adopted with 570 votes in favour, 78 against and 24 abstentions. It proposes detailed measures to be taken in key economic sectors, and calls for climate change issues to be incorporated 'in all spheres and policies'. Importantly, the report acknowledges that long-term education efforts are crucial, particularly in terms of combating scepticism, as citizens need to be fully engaged in the process of tackling climate change. The measures set out by the resolution seemingly touch on all areas of society: energy, biofuels, energy efficiency, mobility, carbon capture and storage, agriculture, forests, soil protection, water management, fisheries, waste and resource management and health, to name but a few. The report highlights the importance of the EU's Seventh Research Framework Programme for the development of 'green' energy sources, and calls on the Council and the Commission to support energy priorities in forthcoming research-framework programmes. 'Improved efficiency alone will not spark off a technological revolution,' according to the report, 'but will necessitate an integrated strategy at EU, national and local level to boost R&D in novel and advanced technologies and processes, and to strengthen their take-up'.

The little climate finance CD: a guide to financing options for forests and climate change | Global Canopy Programme
The CD highlights relevant issues for financing forests and how REDD+ will play a crucial role in developing countries' efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate change. The CD is presented in three sections corresponding to the three key areas of international climate negotiations: revenue generation, the options for delivery of finance and the proposals for institutional arrangements. It also compares the different options and draws conclusions across these different areas. It aims to help key stakeholders including governments, NGOs, the private sector, indigenous peoples and local communities to compare existing and future proposals for climate finance in a consistent way.

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Climate change the solution: be veg go green save the planet | Supreme Masters TV
The best solution for the urgent situation right now is a vegetarian diet, and it should be openly endorsed and even made into law if possible, to protect people, animals and the planet. According to reports, livestock raising is responsible for at least 51 percent of global warming. Report show that global shift to vegan diet could cut climate change mitigation costs by 80%.

ISPRS Ahmedabad 2009 workshop: impacts of climate change on agriculture | International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing
ICCA 2009 (International Workshop on Impact of Climate Change on Agriculture) is jointly organized by the ISPRS WG VIII/6, GEOTask AG 07 03 and the Indian Society of Remote Sensing and hosted by Space Applications Centre and Indian Society of Remote Sensing – Ahmedabad Chapter. ICCA 2009 aims at providing a forum to research scientists for exchanging ideas related to various themes such as climate variability & agriculture, impact assessment, mitigation and adaptation measures and use of EO data as input to climate models. Climate change is one of the most important global environmental challenges, with implications for food production, water supply, health, energy, etc. The weather indicators of global change include increased global mean surface temperature; increased continental precipitation (Northern hemisphere), increased heavy precipitation events and increased frequency and severity of drought.

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Climate change China 's actions: changement climatique
China attaches great importance to tackling climate change. In 2007, it established the National Leading Group on Climate Change, headed by the Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao. That same year, China issued its National Climate Change Program, the first ever by a developing country. In its National Climate Change Program, China set an objective to lower its energy consumption per unit of GDP by 20 per cent or so of 2005 level by 2010 and in its Mid- and Long-Term Plan for the Development of Renewable Energy, China also sets an objective of increasing the proportion of renewable energy in the primary energy mix to 10 percent by 2010, and to 15 per cent by 2020.

Responding to Climate Change | IEA GHG R&D Programme
The IEA welcomes the Copenhagen Accord, which provides guidance on the next steps towards a legally ‐ binding agreement on climate change. The Accord: provides a clear environmental goal of limiting the increase in global temperature to 2 degrees Celsius . It calls for emissions to peak as early as possible as well as a collective commitment by developed countries to financially support developing country actions in mitigation and adaptation and lays out the foundation for support to developing country actions, over and above their unilateral actions. However, IEA calculations show that emission reduction pledges to date fall short of what is needed to limit the long-term concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere to 450 parts per million (ppm) of CO2-equivalent, in line with a 2 degrees C increase.

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Let's make climate for change: selection of side events of the United Nations Climate Change Conference COP14 | UNFCCC
The CD is a compilation of the report of the events that were organized during the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Poznań on December 2008. At Poznań , the finishing touches were put to the Kyoto Protocol's Adaptation Fund, with Parties agreeing that the Adaptation Fund Board should have legal capacity to grant direct access to developing countries. Progress was also made on a number of important ongoing issues that are particularly important for developing countries, including: adaptation; finance; technology; reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD); and disaster management .A key event at the Conference was a ministerial round table on a shared vision on long-term cooperative action on climate change. The round table provided the opportunity to lay the foundations for further work on the components of an agreed outcome at COP 15 in Copenhagen

CDM projects | NATSOURCE
Natsource LLC, a leading global provider of asset management, origination and structuring and advisory and research services in emissions and renewable energy markets. Natsource Carbon Asset Pool (NAT-CAP) it is a new greenhouse gas compliance product dedicated to European entities. Participants have committed €46 million (US$71 million), and include Union Fenosa and Eneco. The pool, which will purchase carbon credits that participants can use to comply with emissions targets, has a €200 million target to serve industrial firms required to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. Natsource in 2005 established the Greenhouse Gas Credit Aggregation Pool (GG-CAP), one of the earliest and largest private-sector compliance funds, which attracted corporate participants from Europe , Canada and Japan .

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Prototype Carbon Fund: a public private partnership: Annual Report 2002
A partnership between seventeen companies and six governments that is managed by the World Bank, the Prototype Carbon Fund (PCF) became operational in April 2000.As the first carbon fund, its mission is to pioneer the market for project-based greenhouse gas emission reductions while promoting sustainable development and offering a learning-by-doing opportunity to its stakeholders. The Fund pioneered this market through pilot production of Emission Reductions within the framework of Joint Implementation (JI) and the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM).In practice, this means that the fund buys carbon credits from a closed project portfolio of 23 projects in developing countries and in "economies in transition".

Documenting Climate Change: the complete collection of UNFCCC documentation 2006, 8 |United Nations Climate Change Convention (set of 4 CDs)
This disk forms part of a growing multi-volume suite in CD-ROM format providing ready reference to all official documentation issued since 1991 as part of the process of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and of the Kyoto Protocol including: Full Convention and Protocol texts, UNFCCC official documents including: conference and technical papers, reports, decisions and resolutions, in all available UN languages, Country information including: national communications on greenhouse gas emissions trends and policy responses, in-depth reviews of national communications, synthesis and assessment reports of annual inventories, individual reviews of greenhouse gas inventories, Conference materials such as: agendas, daily programmes and lists of participants for UNFCCC meetings, Background publications and interpretive guides on climate change.

Brazil's initial national communication to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change
The presentation of Brazil 's National Communication is a decisive institutional step towards honoring the country's frame of mind as an active participant in theme-related issues; the text contributes to a better understanding of the global problems and of climate change-related science advances. Developing countries have no commitments to reduce or limit their anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, as established by the Convention and confirmed by the Kyoto Protocol. The priorities for Brazil refer to meeting pressing social and economic needs, such as poverty eradication, improving education and health conditions, among others. Thus, developing countries such as Brazil are faced with challenges of the 21 st century, without having overcome the problems of 19 th century.

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Action makes a difference: climate strategy and action in Sweden
The Swedish Strategy for Sustainable Economic, Social and Environmental Development (2003 / 04:129) is a revised version of the national strategy for sustainable development presented in 2002. Drawn up in co-operation with the Left Party, the strategy builds on the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development held in Johannesburg, the EU strategy for sustainable development and the so-called Lisbon process, and addresses the three dimensions of sustainable development: economic, social and environmental. Environment forms one of the key issues in connection with future global efforts to promote sustainable development. The overall aim of Swedish environmental policy is to hand on to the next generation a society in which the major environmental problems have been solved.

Climate plan 2004 | France
France's 2004 climate plan, which pledges to reach or even beat the 2010 Kyoto targets, is under fire from climate activists and the socialist opposition. The "Plan Climat 2004" pledges to cut CO2 emissions by 54 million equivalent tonnes per year in order to respect the Kyoto targets. The plan states that the targets could even be slightly surpassed by 2010. It focuses on five main action areas for 2010 were Bonus malus' system for CO2 emissions from cars, Biofuels, Eco-housing, Labelling, Sustainable air-conditioning

Save our planet | Yudhoyono, Susilo Bambang
Indonesia 's President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono released his third pop album in 2007.
"In my struggle to serve the country, sometimes during my leisure time, I express my feelings in the form of arts," Yudhoyono told the Jakarta Post. The album is entitled "I'm Certain I'll Make It." The nine songs include tracks from different genres including R&B to country and titles like "My Soul was Enlightened that Night," "For You Sweet Child" and "Save Our Planet." Yudhoyono doesn't sing on the album, but instead collaborated with local artists.

In good company: corporate India and the climate challenge
In good company is a film by the Centre for Social Markets on corporate India and the climate challenge. Packed with interviews with India’s leading CEOs and entrepreneurs, the film shows how India Inc is poised to take leadership on climate change. The film was launched on 25 May 2009 at the World Business Summit on Climate Change in Copenhagen. While much of the focus of the Summit was on what western companies are doing, the film brought out just how much potential there is in India to lead a paradigm shift to a low-carbon economy. The 54-minute documentary tells the little-known story of how Indian companies and entrepreneurs are beginning to respond to the climate challenge. With India set to become one of the world’s top three emitters of greenhouse gases by 2015, the film is a timely reminder of the need to focus attention on how emerging markets will respond to a carbon-constrained global economy with all the risks and opportunities it implies.

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Building a low carbon economy
The CD outlines the proactive role being played by Indian Industry, with support from the government, in adopting technologies and practices that will help India leapfrog to a low carbon economy. It lists a large number of technological measures to be adopted in the short-, medium- and long-term in various industries - aluminium, cement, ceramics, glass, pulp & paper, co-generation steam and condensate systems, sugar, textile, foundry, iron and steel, fertilizer and engineering industries and for enhancing the efficiency of power plants. It also provides the various initiatives taken by civil society in this direction and illustrates that the risks posed by climate change can be tackled and converted into business opportunities.

Inventory of glaciers, glacial lakes and identification of potential Glacial Lake Outburst affected by global warming in the mountains of Himalayan region
The main objective of the study was to assess the threat from glacial lakes and to highlight those where GLOF (glacial lake outburst flood) events are likely to occur and cause serious damage to human life and property. The study covered Tista Basin in Sikkim, Himachal and Uttaranchal Himalaya of India, Pumqu basin, Poiqu, Rongxer, Jilongcangbu, Zangbuqin, Majiacangbu, Daoliqu and Jiazhangangge basins of Tibet Autonomous Region of China, and Astor sub basin, upper Indus, Jhelum, Shingo, Shyok, Shigar, Gilgit, Chitral, Hunza and Swat River basins of Indus basin in Pakistan.

India's ecological footprint: a business perspective
This report examines the balance between India’s demand on and supply of natural capital. It shows that India is depleting its ecological assets in supporting its current economic boom. The report, 'India's Ecological Footprint: A Business Perspective', the first of its kind in India was prepared jointly by CII and Global Footprint Network, USA with the support of World Wide Fund for Nature-India. India's ecological footprint – the amount of productive land and sea area required to produce the resources it consumes and absorb its waste – has doubled since 1961, according to the report.

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Climate Change 2007: Fourth Assessment Report. IPCC
The CD comprises the reports of the three working groups of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC):
Working Group I Report: "The Physical Science Basis"
Working Group II Report: "Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability"
Working Group III Report: "Mitigation of Climate Change"

Beyond Kyoto : Energy dynamics and climate stabilization
This study focuses on the way to proceed beyond Kyoto to mitigate climate change.Mitigating climate change will require profound changes in world energy production and use. While the full effects of climate change are not likely to be felt for decades, the need for action is more immediate, for changes in greenhouse gas concentrations are almost irreversible. Solutions exist in the form of energy efficiency improvements, fuel switching to non-carbon sources, and carbon recovery and storage. But the long-term costs of mitigation and the precise extent and pace of climate damage remain uncertain. The CD further outlines the need for strong and flexible answer at a global level, dealing with uncertainties, price caps and non-binding targets, dynamic targets and timing and allocation.

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Climate policy project activities
The project of the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) focuses on designing and proposing both international and domestic policy measures, synchronizing with the development of the international negotiations in the field of climate change. The project aims to contribute to policy-making processes through governmental committees, international meetings and other channels. The specific research themes under the project includes effective domestic policy measures which contribute to the goals of the Kyoto Protocol, effective measures for climate change mitigation from the aspect of industry and business sectors, and technology, International cooperative mechanisms among developed and developing countries, Inventory method for GHG emissions and sinks, Vulnerability assessment and adaptation measures in the Asia-Pacific region. The project themes are set as research topics that should have foundations laid in the Second Phase, with a view to future long-term needs of the international community.

Climate policy information package 2003: Comprehensive guide covering research and information outreach activities
The CD provides information regarding the Climate Policy Project Activities and Plan under three main sections first, the Business Plan Fiscal Year 2003, wherein, the project will build on research conducted during FY2001 and FY2002 focusing on three themes viz., domestic policies, international cooperation, and vulnerability issues, while conducting groundwork for research on ‘Beyond Kyoto Issues’ planned for Phase 3 (2004-2007). Followed by the Climate Policy Project Annual Plan 2002 which highlights the projects themes, methodology, content of research, GHG Emission/Sink Inventory and Climate Change Impact Assessment, budget estimated personnel requirements and events. Lastly, Climate Change Project 1998-2001 Activity this part provides information about the background of the research, methods and approaches adopted, major findings, evaluations of the project, and achievements. The CD also includes information about IGES, workshops, presentation and discussion material of the project.

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Climate policy information package 2005
The CD provides complete information about the research activities and its objectives that are, to evaluate domestic policies and their implications for Asian countries, to propose measures for effective implementation of Kyoto mechanisms in Asia, to identify ways to achieve global participation and strengthen future climate regime beyond Kyoto, to recommend policies for reducing vulnerability and enhancing adaptive capacity in Asia. Also includes information about the strategies of the research, plan and reports, workshops on domestic policies, Kyoto Mechanism, Beyond Kyoto, Adaptation and presentation and working papers.

Climate change resource kit: Regional Biodiversity Programme, Asia/ IUCN
The effects of climate change are already being felt in Asia and are likely to intensify in the years to come. Substantial elevation shifts of ecosystems in the mountains and uplands of S/SEA are projected. At high elevations, weedy species can be expected to displace tree species, although the rates of change could be slow and constrained by increased erosion in mountain areas. Changes in the distribution patterns of monsoon forests will be complex. For instance, in Thailand, area of tropical forests could increase from 45% to 80% of total cover. Similarly, for Sri Lanka a decrease in tropical rainforest of 2%-11% and an increase in tropical dry forest of 7%-8% are estimated. More than 10% (43 million ha) of global freshwater wetlands or peatlands are located in this humid tropical zone of Asia. Projected increases in evapo-transpiration and rainfall are likely to have a negative impact on the viability of peat, resulting in their shrinkage and desiccation. Rise in sea level and increases in sea-surface temperature are most probable major climate change related stresses on coastal ecosystems. Coral reefs are particularly sensitive to increases in seawater temperature and increased irradiance as this has been shown to cause coral bleaching.

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Global change and ecosystems: EU research for the environment
Focusing on important areas such as climate change, natural resources, land and urban management, the marine environment or the quality of life for European citizens, European environmental research provides crucial data to support policy-making. Impact assessment and monitoring efforts inform the European Union’s negotiation of international conventions and form the basis of sustainable policies in areas as diverse as energy, tourism, industry, health and transport. The CD provides a comprehensive overview of the work that was launched under the FP6 banner between 2002 and 2006. The Global Change and Ecosystems research on greenhouse gas emissions, the water cycle, biodiversity, desertification, sustainable land management and climate modelling has been groundbreaking for its science. It is contributing to a cleaner and healthier environment for our children and grandchildren.

IPCC: good practice guidance for land use, land-use change and forestry
This report on Good Practice Guidance for Land Use, Land-Use Change and Forestry (GPG-LULUCF) is the response to the invitation by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to develop good practice guidance for land use, land-use change and forestry (LULUCF). GPG-LULUCF provides supplementary methods and good practice guidance for estimating, measuring, monitoring and reporting on carbon stock changes and greenhouse gas emissions from LULUCF activities under Article 3, paragraphs 3 and 4, and Articles 6 and 12 of the Kyoto Protocol. The GPG-LULUCF assists countries in producing inventories for the land use, land-use change and forestry sector that are neither over- nor underestimates so far as can be judged, and in which uncertainties are reduced as far as practicable. It supports the development of inventories that are transparent, documented, consistent over time, complete, comparable, assessed for uncertainties, subject to quality control and quality assurance, and efficient in the use of resources.

2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories
The 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories build on the previous Revised 1996 IPCC Guidelines and the subsequent Good Practice reports in an evolutionary manner to ensure that moving from the previous guidelines to these new guidelines is as straightforward as possible. These new guidelines cover new sources and gases as well as updates to previously published methods where technical and scientific knowledge have improved. This guidance assists countries in compiling complete, national inventories of greenhouse gases. The guidance has been structured so that any country, regardless of experience or resources, should be able to produce reliable estimates of their emissions and removals of these gases. In particular, default values of the various parameters and emission factors required are supplied for all sectors, so that, at its simplest, a country needs only supply national activity data. The approach also allows countries with more information and resources to use more detailed country-specific methodologies while retaining compatibility, comparability and consistency between countries. The guidance also integrates and improves earlier guidance on good practice in inventory compilation so that the final estimates are neither over- nor under-estimates as far as can be judged and uncertainties are reduced as far as possible. Guidance is also provided to identify areas of the inventory whose improvement would most benefit the inventory overall. Hence limited resources can be focused on those areas most in need of improvement to produce the best practical inventory.

Protecting health from climate change: contents of docket (WHO)
The IPCC report highlighted a wide range of implications for human health. Climate change can cause death anddisease through extreme weather events such as heatwaves, floods and droughts. At the same time, meeting increasing energy demands by greater use of fossil fuels will add to air pollution and will worsen a number of respiratory disorders. In light of this scenario, it is vital for the health sector to prepare for the challenges posed by climate change. Effective action to protect human health from climatechange can be achieved with stronger and well coordinated national health systems that give priority to climate-sensitive diseases—notably at the primary care level. Key preventive public health actions will need to aim both: to improve health today and to reduce vulnerability to climate change in the future. Individuals,communities, the corporate sector and national authorities need to make the behavioural and policychanges that will bring immediate health benefits and also reduce the impact on human health from global climate change.This challenge is possibly the biggest that humanity has ever had to confront. The first step is to raise awareness and public understanding of the health consequences of climate change and that is the objective of World Health Day 2008 and its theme of “Protecting Health from Climate Change”

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US action to address energy security, clean development and climate change
The United States is taking action on a comprehensive and dynamic strategy to address climate change at home and abroad. This approach is designed to foster breakthroughs in clean energy technologies and encourages coordinated global activities that help meet the ultimate objective of the United Nations Framework Convention on climate change: stabilizing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations at a level that prevents dangerous human interference with the climate system while enabling sustainable economic development. The US recognized the recent reports by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change have substantially improved the science that guides policy decisions. The recent IPCC conclusions highlight the need to set wise and effective policies to confront the challenges of energy security and climate.The United States is meeting these challenges by integrating actions to address climate change and energy security into a broader agenda that promotes pollution reduction and sustainable economic development because those actions will be more sustainable and successful if they produce multiple economic and environmental benefits.


 
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